Tag Archives: Fly Fishing For Bluegill

A Pumpkinseed's Colors Rival Any Fish
Fresh, Salt, Tropical or Temperate

I wish I could fly fish for trout more often. Unfortunately, good trout fishing isn't nearby. On top of that, the summer is my time to fish. And during July and August, New Jersey's major trout rivers push 70 degrees and it's best to lay off.

That's why a lot of my summer fly fishing is on local lakes and ponds. I love casting to panfish, bass, and if I can find them - carp. I fish from the bank, from my SUP, or from a belly boat.

No matter what I'm fishing for, I keep the striped bass work ethic alive.

Getting up in the dark and fishing first light is common when chasing striped bass. But many anglers don't do the same on trout streams or when fishing local freshwater ponds and lakes. Dawn patrol fishing, combined with a midweek morning, provides solitude and a better shot at fish. Not to mention beautiful sights and sounds. The world is a different place at dawn.

Here are some of my catches and takeaways.

A Summer Fly: Dave Whitlock's Hopper

Terrestrials, like hoppers, ants, and beetles, are a major food source for trout in the summer. They're also eaten by panfish and largemouth along the shoreline of lakes and ponds. Plus, they're a lot more fun to cast than big, air resistant bass poppers. Dropping a hopper next to a grass-lined bank and twitching it slightly to imitate a panicked grasshopper can result in some incredibly fun visual fishing.

Summer Largemouth
Egg Eater, Maybe This Fish Took It For A Berry
Closer Look

Across the street from my home is a lake with water quality issues. It's victim to a large population of geese and receives a tremendous amount of storm-water runoff. With minimal water flow, it sits stagnant throughout the summer. Water temps are high and visibility is low.

I love urban fishing, but I don't think this lake can support bluegill or largemouth. The only fish I've ever seen are carp. They're tough as nails.

This Carp Turned and Ate A Black Bead Head Mini Bugger

The lake was recently dredged to hold more water and prevent flooding. Now the only shallow areas are along the shoreline, many times underneath overhanging trees. That's where I find carp rooting around in the mud for food, usually on calm mornings or evenings. If the wind is up, they seem to be either deep or just difficult to see.

Although bait fishing for carp is popular, if you're after them with a fly rod, it's a sight fishing game. Blind casting is a waste of time. I haven't caught many, but I've had success with small streamers like mini buggers. Another option is fishing an egg pattern. Carp are known to be omnivorous. They eat mulberries and cottonwood seeds. So an egg fished under a tree is probably mistaken for a berry or seed.

Carp are known to be selective and spooky, but the fish near my home are not pressured. When fishing, I've learned to lookout for reaction strikes. A reasonable fly, dropped in front of their nose, can result in a quick take.

Closer Look

It's cliche, but time flies. And the older I get, the faster the flight.

We're halfway through August. Soon I'll be going back to school to prep and grind my brain back to bells and lesson plans.

Rubber Legged Popper Eater
Keep 'Em Wet - All Fish Like It

But it ain't over yet. There's still time for a few more dawn patrol sessions, fueled by strong coffee and visions of big fish on a long rod.

Keep 'Em Wet - All Fish Like It

2 Comments

Date: 7/31/18

Time: 6 - 9 am

Morning glass.

Location: Assunpink Lake

Weather: Scattered Clouds, Morning Air Temperature 70 - 75, Water Temperature In The Shallows Felt Like 80+, No Wind Early, Picked Up Around 8:15 Out of the East 5 - 10 mph, Moon: Waning Gibbous Approximately 80% Visible, Pressure 30.14

Damselfly nymph on the deck of my SUP.

Catch and Thoughts: Fly fishing local ponds and lakes is an absolute blast. Today I fished from my stand up paddle board (SUP). The conditions were ideal. No wind. Instead of getting blown around, I easily stayed in one place. I could also stand and fish, instead of casting from my knees.

When I put in at the boat ramp, I paddled north, straight across the lake. Once I reached the opposite shoreline I turned right. I figured I'd take advantage of my SUP and slowly paddle the shallows, casting poppers and small streamers close to shoreline structure. I was in water most boats couldn't access.

I ended up with two bass. One ate a large popper. The other I hooked on a small streamer that I tied off the hook bend of a different popper. This second set up is just like the dry dropper rigs used when trout fishing moving water. Similar set ups can be used in still water, whether you're chasing trout or bass and panfish. When bass fishing, popper dropper rigs have a lot going for them. First, they allow you to suspend your dropper fly over weeds in shallow water. Also, the bass popper works double duty. It can fool fish on its own while also acting as a bobber/indicator that lets you know when a fish eats your dropper fly.

Date: 4/13/18

Time: 5:00 - 5:45 pm

Location: Local Pond

Weather: Sunny, Warm, and Windy, Air Temperature 75, Water Temperature 62 - 63, Wind WSW and Stiff, Moon 11% Visible, Pressure 29.91

Catch: After another week of unseasonably cold days, today felt incredible. I'm writing this on Saturday, 4/14, and it's another beauty - sunny and warm. Unfortunately, the temperature is dropping tonight. The upcoming week isn't supposed to break the low 50s.

During this short trip, I managed a beautiful little pumpkinseed sunfish, a small largemouth bass, and a black crappie. I was connected to a better largemouth, but he shook my barbless fly. I fished a black bead head mini bugger on 3X tippet.

Last summer I was encouraged to fish mini buggers by the crew at the Housatonic River Outfitters.

I fished the Housatonic on September 3, 2017. My New Jersey brain was still in summer mode. I expected to be targeting smallmouth bass in a warm river. But by September 3rd, Connecticut was already well into a string of cool days and cold nights. The river's water temperature was falling. This caused the trout in the thermal refuges to spread back out into the main river.

After getting a license, some flies, and guidance at the shop, I swung bead head mini buggers and had a blast with both smallmouth and trout. The mini bugger has become a favorite fly.

Here's my best picture from that Housy trip, 9/3/17.